Thursday, January 03, 2008

Elect Alexander Lacson for Nobel Prize for Literature

Now that I got your attention, I want to tell you that I am being sarcastic. What is with Inquirer and Alexander Lacson. First, Inquirer put on front page this lawyer's attempt of a book. The book is called “12 Little Things every Filipino Can Do to Help our Country.” Nothing remarkable with the pamphlet. Anyone who knows how to use Google search can come up with the same book, even better. And now Lacson came out with one poem and he makes it in the paper again. I quote the whole article:
After a year just past that saw numerous scandals rock the government, Marines beheaded, activists and journalists killed, explosions in Congress and a crowded mall, all capped by the takeover of a posh hotel by rebellious forces, a Filipino author has a wish for a country that would bring out the best in its people so that they may become the “light” for the rest of the world.

“I dream of a Philippines that brings out the best in the Filipino people, so the Filipino may enrich mankind and enable the world,” Alexander Lacson wrote in a poem titled “My Dream Philippines.”

“A society that draws out the most beautiful in the Filipino/so the Filipino may shine and become a model for all humanity.

“A place that creates so much good and beauty/so our Philippines may become a light to all the world.

Lacson, 42, author of the book “12 Little Things every Filipino Can Do to Help our Country” and the pamphlet “10 Little Things Pinoys Abroad Can Do to Help our Philippines,” shared the poem embodying his wishes for the country with the Inquirer.

“I wrote this dream -- My Dream Philippines -- because I believe in the power of dreams,” he said in an e-mail.

“I believe a dream has the power to provide a path, a road. It gives us direction, which way to go. At the end of that road is the destination, the finish line, the attainment of the goal or dream” he said.

Lacson said the wonders of the world -- the Great Wall of China, the Great Pyramids of Egypt, the Taj Mahal in India, and more recently Petronas Towers in Malaysia -- all “began as dreams in the minds of their builders.”

“I believe that each one of the great things in our world today began as a dream somewhere, sometime in the past,” he said.

Lacson, who is writing his second book, “Eight Little Things All Filipinos Should Know on Why We Should Be Proud as Filipinos,” said he also dreams of a Philippines that is “wonderful for its sense of unity and community” because, after all, “love of country is higher than love for oneself or family.”

“A nation that provides all the happiness and fulfillment there is in the world/so our people will look to no other place on earth for home but here.

“A country that my children, as all our children, can proudly say/“My beautiful Philippines, you are my beloved home.”

Lacson, a lawyer by profession, said he believes that a dream, as shown by history, has the power to unite and define a people.

“A dream is like a magnet, it has the power of drawing people to it. A dream -- one that is truly built on a people’s deep-seated aspirations and needs -- can unite a community or a society,” he said in the e-mail.

“A country whose government protects and cares for the weakest of our people/whose leaders and elders truly act with love and service in their hearts.

“A nation whose citizens who have more in life care for those who have less/and those who are strong help and protect those who are weak.

“A place that truly values the beauty of its people’s ideas and freedoms/and allows them to bloom even in the darkest hour of gloom.

“A society where genuine justice is accessible to everyone/because the law exempts no one, and justice is always blind.”

Lacson said the lack of a “common dream” creates a huge void in Filipinos’ lives, hence, the need to “march into the future with a common dream.”

Lacson said he wrote his “Dream” because he believes Filipinos deserve a “beautiful place.”

“In fact, I believe God wants a beautiful place for all of us. God wants us to become prosperous and great. God want us to have a prosperous and great country,” he said.

He ended his poem thus: “All told, I dream of a Philippines that is beautiful because God is its anchor/where our people believe that only genuine love for one another/will make us truly wonderful as a people and truly great as a nation.”


From the little I know about the poem, these are what I can tell you:

1) It is trying to copy Martin Luther King's "I Have A Dream" and it never succeeded. One, King used repetition wonderfully. This one used repetition like a lawyer
2) Only an amateur moronic poet uses "In fact" in his verses
3) All the images (light for Philippines, dreams as road) have been used a million times already
4) Borgonio wrote, "Lacson said the lack of a “common dream” creates a huge void in Filipinos’ lives, hence, the need to “march into the future with a common dream.”" Guess who used common dream first for the Filipinos? Marcos. Isang bansa, isang diwa.
5) The only time the poem had a rhyme was: "A place that truly values the beauty of its people’s ideas and freedoms/and allows them to bloom even in the darkest hour of gloom." Freedoms? Gloom? Sophomoric. Pathetic.
6) "Lacson said the wonders of the world -- the Great Wall of China, the Great Pyramids of Egypt, the Taj Mahal in India, and more recently Petronas Towers in Malaysia -- all “began as dreams in the minds of their builders.”" Hmm. Lacson, read that poem of Brecht and you will know that all these monuments couldn't have been there without slave labor. Did you ever think about that? No, you only think of the magnificence which means you really don't know empathy, a crucial trait of poets.
7) Actually, I don't trust people who comes out with simplistic ways to save the Philippines, much more the world. I will never call Lacson a visionary, maybe a lawyer who has media contacts.
8) So when Lacson comes out with a play, Inquirer will have a banner story. Winner!
9) There is a new theory that your dreams were affected only by what happened to you in the past two weeks. So this dream had a vision of only two weeks.
10) Lacson dreams in abstractions. Can you dream of peace? Of love? You don't dream of abstractions. You dream of images. That means Lacson is lying and he is like a magnet who drew us into his grandiose lies. In fact, that was the only nice line in the poem (A dream is like a magnet, it has the power of drawing people to it) because the "drawing people" is startling. Otherwise a dream as a magnet is a hard image to imagine.

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6 Comments:

Blogger The Nashman said...

this is so funny, must be put next to that nursing dean who wrote that novel....

ps. if you is still enterested in the red moleskin, me want mailing address.

12:35 AM  
Anonymous volume-addict said...

Looks like stuff that's more for the Self-Help section at bookstores--just like the same feelgood tomes by Deepak Chopra or that faddish crap The Secret, which seems to be force fed to everyone by these people that watch way too much Oprah or Dr Phil.

3:07 AM  
Anonymous ebudae88 said...

maybe, he didn't intend an audience for himself? hehe but wtf at least he has a dream. That's what a messy country does to its people. . .to indulge so much in dreaming. . . soon many people will be messianics

10:44 AM  
Blogger frank cimatu said...

Ha ha ha. I was anxious last night thinking I was too harsh (Cervesa Negra) and that Lacson would sue me for libel. OMG A red moleskin.

12:10 PM  
Blogger frank said...

Philippine Daily Inquirer Northern Luzon Bureau
Bonauan Apartelle, Happy Glen Loop
Baguio City

12:33 PM  
Blogger The Nashman said...

fota, sinasabi ng laging gamitin ang post code eh...:D

7:10 PM  

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